Funding Arts Broward (FAB) Presents Fifth Annual “Black & White: A Night At The Museum” At NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale

Funding Arts Broward (FAB), a nonprofit organization committed to preserving and cultivating the arts in Broward County, held its fifth annual “Black & White: A Night At The Museum” special event. This elegant black and white themed cocktail party at NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdalel featured an exclusive exhibit tour, live entertainment by Dillard High School Center for the Arts students, light bites and a decadent dessert table. Attendees had the opportunity to experience Lux et Veritas, a FAB-funded exhibit, at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale on a private tour by Bonnie Clearwater, director and chief curator of NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale. Lux et Veritas explores a transformative period in contemporary art by focusing on a generation of artists of color who attended Yale School of Art for graduate studies between 2000 and 2010. The exhibition’s title alludes to Yale University’s motto, “Lux et Veritas,” which translates from Latin to “Light and Truth.” In the context of this exhibition, the title references how these artists thought with critical complexity about their work and their movement through institutional structures.  As with similar programs, Yale School of Art, in New Haven, Connecticut, had not been historically diverse, which spurred these art students to form affiliations across the departments of painting, graphic design, sculpture, photography and art history. They filled gaps in the school’s curriculum and counteracted the lack of diversity among the faculty by inviting artists, curators and writers of color as advisors and guest speakers, developing an interdisciplinary forum, publishing art journals, organizing exhibitions and documenting their experiences in video and photography. The relationships they formed at school evolved into communities that networked and provided essential support and feedback for one another, often passing on these efforts beyond graduate study. Their reevaluation of the Western art canon, and commitment to the method and practice of teaching, has contributed to a greater recognition of artists of color, challenged stereotypes and enriched the overall shared spaces of learning and thinking about art and the art praxis.